Cialis patent expiration date

When does Cialis patent expire?

The protection of the "love pill" Cialis expired in October 2018. In November, the equivalent of tadalafil arrived to the pharmacy shelves. The drug invented by the American pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly was the most sold in the country in 2015 (even more than Viagra). The sales that year hit the all-time high of $1.257 billion that year. Those were the biggest revenues for the company before the scheduled Cialis patent expiration.

With the last day of Eli Lilly’s patent for Cialis, dozens of generic equivalents hit the market, making the Weekend Pill economically accessible like never before. Tadalafil, this is the name of the molecule, was launched on February 14, 2003. On Valentine's Day, in fact. It was immediately nicknamed "Love Pill" and "Weekend Pill". This nicknale appeared because of its long half-life (17 hours), which gives it an effect of about 36 hours – against the four hours offered by its biggest competitor sildenafil (Viagra).

Generic Cialis - Characteristics

On the one hand, this drug can be more appreciated by users who do not like programming sexual intercourse. On the other hand, the longer your ED pill stays around, the bigger the chances of it to interact with another drug you take later. As with Viagra, a reduction in the price of the brand drug followed.

It is not be a life-saving drug, but it still sells like hot cakes. From the scientific point of view, it is the second drug in the class of phosphodiesterase inhibitors type 5 after sildenafil. However, there are no direct comparisons between the two active ingredients capable of establishing the supremacy of one or the other. The effectiveness is probably similar, as are the side effects, with the exception of those on vision. Which, at the moment, appear to be less frequent for tadalafil.

Generic Cialis is totally identical to its brand equivalent, since in order to get the FDA approval, every manufacturer of generic tadalafil has to prove their production standards and materials used are identical to those of the original preparation, and will have the same results as the brand medication.

Why Cialis From India cost less than Cialis Brand?

This is where matters get intersting, actually. The price scissors are created through the difference in patent nature applied in the U.S. and India. While the former have product-oriented patent protection, the patents in India protect the work invested in the production (process patenting). This means that the same product can be produced by any licensed pharmaceutical company to achieve the standardized results, as long as a different process is used.

As a result, multiple drug manufacturers have been producing tadalafil for years now. They all use their unique production process that meets the rigorous standards imposed by the industry. This creates healthy price competition, and monopoly for drug production is made impossible. For you as a customer, this means hefty savings. Compare:

Drug Manufacturer /
Country Of Origin
Package Size Dose Price
Teva Pharmaceuticals (U.S.) 30 tablets 20 mg $600,00
Ajanta Pharma (India) 30 tablets 20 mg $180,00

Unavailable at the physical stores in the U.S., Indian generics of Cialis can be ordered from online pharmacies in Canada – find out here how to make it happen in a risk-free, legal and health-friendly way.

Cialis without prescription?

Some time ago, Lilly, the company that holds the patent, asked to reclassify tadalafil as a drug salable without a prescription. In May 2014, in agreement with Sanofi, the company had therefore proposed Cialis as an OTC in Europe, the U.S., Canada and Australia. Same request made by Pfzer for its Viagra product was made in 2008 and approved by the healthcare authorities of the U.K., New Zealand, Norway and is earnestly considered by the Swedish Medicine Agency. But in the U.S., the answer was the same for both: negative.

Meanwhile, Lilly has increased the price of the medicine since January 2017 (as every odd year when companies are allowed to make increases) and not by little – a probable strategy to buffer losses in view of the expiry of the patent.