University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center

Center for Research on Minority Health/Health Disparities, Education, Awareness, Research and Training Consortium (HDEART)

Contact Information
Director
Training Site Overview
Institutional Resources
Training Site Expectations

Contact Information

Center for Research on Minority Health
The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center
Division of Cancer Prevention & Population Sciences,
Department of Health Disparities Research

Mailing address:
Unit 639
M. D. Anderson Cancer Center
P.O. Box 301402
Houston, TX 77230-1402

Physical Address:
2450 Holcombe Blvd., Suite TMC1.3300
Houston, TX 77021
Phone: (713) 563 -CRMH (2764)
Toll-Free 1-866-416-CRMH (2764)
Main FAX: (713) 563-2765
E-mail: lajones@mdanderson.org or crmh@mdanderson.org
Director: Lovell A. Jones, Ph.D.

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Director: Lovell A. Jones, Ph.D.

Lovell A. Jones, Ph.D., is Director of the Congressionally-mandated Center for Research on Minority Health and Professor of Health Disparities Research & Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, received Ph.D. (in Zoology with an emphasis in Endocrinology and Tumor Biology) from the University of University of California, Berkeley. He has been a member of the graduate faculty of the University of Texas School of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center since 1982. Over the almost three decades, Dr. Jones has trained over 100 students and/or fellows in his laboratory, ranging from high school students to clinical fellows. He has also published over 120 scientific articles ranging from hormonal carcinogenesis to health policy. In 1989, he edited one of the few comprehensive textbooks on health disparities entitled "Minorities & Cancer." Since 1980, Dr. Jones has received over $20,000,000 in direct cost research funding in which he served or presently serves the Principal Investigator (PI) or Co-PI. In 1992, Dr. Jones served as a member of the Clinical Research Panel of the National Task Force on the NIH Strategic Plan. ; For his work in the area of Cancer Prevention, Dr. Jones was selected as the 1996 recipient of the UTMD Anderson Cancer Center Faculty Award in Cancer Prevention. He has served as a member of Sigma Xi's 62nd College of Distinguished Lecturers. In 2000, Dr. Jones received the Legacy of Leadership Award from Howard University Hospital and has been twice honored on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives for his work addressing health disparities in the underserved. In 2002 Dr. Jones was award the Humanitarian Award by the American Cancer Society, Inc and Sisters Network, Inc. Visionary Award. In 2004, Dr. Jones was honored by the Board of Sponsors of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month for his research efforts over the last twenty years to address breast cancer. Dr. Jones was recently awarded t National Institutes of Health/National Center on Minority Health & Health Disparities Director's Award in Health Disparities Excellence, Dr. Jones current research covers a number of areas, but generally can be placed in to three areas, Nutritional Intervention, Gene-Environment Interaction and Health Outcomes. However, it should be stated that Kellogg Health Scholars are not limited to these three broad areas.

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Training Site Overview

The Scholars at the Center for Research on Minority Health/Health Disparities, Education, Awareness Research and Training Consortium (HDEART) focused on using a biopsychosocial approach to addressing health disparities. Because faculty can be drawn from a multitude of institutions, it is hard to limit the scope of areas that a scholar might do their research in. For instance, our previous scholars have been drawn from molecular biologist to health communication specialist. The common theme that has bound them together is our biopsychosocial approach to addressing health disparities, the uniqueness being applying this in biomedical environment. Scholars in the Center for Research on Minority Health/HDEART were trained to blend their talents in manner that make them, what we refer to as renaissance scientists, individuals who are able to lead a multidisciplinary/transdisciplinary team in addressing health disparities.

The major themes of previous research projects have revolved around:
  • health disparities research through a community/participatory based research approach;
  • interdisciplinary approaches to developing solutions to health disparities, wherein natural scientists, social scientists, and community advocates work collaboratively to develop new insights; and
  • inter-institutional efforts from an array of faculty, leveraging their intellectual strength, diversity of ideas, and energy to address a single health disparity issue
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Institutional Resources

The CRMH/HDEART brings together the strengthens of over 31 member institutions, including the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Rice University, Baylor College of Medicine, University of Houston Central Campus, University of Houston Downtown Campus, Prairie View University and its College of Nursing, Texas A & M University Health Science Center, Texas Southern University, Texas Tech University Health Science Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, University of Texas Southwestern at Dallas, Texas Woman's University, Meharry Medical College, Tulane University, University of Miami and the Veteran Administration Hospital at Houston) to focus on developing solutions to health disparities.

The core mentoring faculty for each Scholar was drawn from faculty members at member institutions of the Health Disparities, Education, Awareness, Research and Training Consortium (HDEART). For example, each of the Scholars selected at least four, averaging five, mentoring faculty, with at least one of those faculty members being in the area of health policy. Previous members have been drawn from Baylor College of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center and Rice University.

Kellogg Health Scholars

2010-2012 Cohort: LaKeisha Batts, PhD, Kimberly Enard, PhD, Stacy M. Lloyd, PhD and Lucinda Nevarez, PhD

2009-2011 Cohort: Shelly Hovick, PhD
2008-2010 Cohort: Patricia Miranda, PhD and Anthony Omojasola, DrPH
2006-2008 Cohort: Angelica Herrera, PhD, Gina Evans, PhD, and Amy Snipes, PhD


Other Resources
Each scholar at the CRMH/HDEART site was provided with their individual offices with access to Computers (PC/MAC), internet, and telephone. The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center IDs issued to scholars provided them with access to all University facilities such as libraries, free shuttle bus rides between the CRMH and the Texas Medical Center.

Opportunities for Interactions with peers
Becoming a Kellogg Scholar at the CRMH/HDEART site meant you will become a member of a broader community of other talented postdoctoral research fellows, not only within the Division of Cancer Preventions & Populations Sciences at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, but the Postdoctoral Fellows Associate of the institutions as well as opportunities to interact regularly with HDEART member institutions within the Texas Medical Center. The Kellogg Scholars had an opportunity to take part in numerous seminar series as well as participate in the Disparities in Health in America: Working Toward Social Justice Workshop and Course.

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Training Site Expectations

How many projects are recommended?
Our scholars worked on one primary project, with the opportunity to work on one or more projects simultaneously during a typical year. We generally limited the fellow to one primary and two secondary. For example, we encouraged scholars to develop a project that will aid them in developing their K applications, while working with their mentors on an analysis of a large data-set or other projects that aided them with their publication record during their fellowship. Our aim was to maximize the training experience and productivity of scholars during their two years at the CRMH/HDEART Site. We asked that the scholars begin to identify their mentoring team prior to joining us and then solidify the team within the first few months.

Policy on teaching and employment
In order to maximize the postdoctoral learning experience, we did not encourage teaching of courses or outside employment by our scholars. However, during their second year, scholars were asked to participate either by teaching a lecture and/or co-organizing the Disparities in Health in America: Working Toward Social Justice course.

Expectations of publications/grant proposals
In line with the expectations of most academic institutions, we expected scholars to publish, if they have not already done so, work for their dissertation as well as other peer-reviewed articles each year, a minimum of 2 to 3 papers. One of the unique aspects of the CRMH/HDEART site was access to the Department of Scientific Publications and the associated programs of the Postdoctoral Fellowship Association at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. Scholars at CRMH/HDEART were expected to learn the granting proposals process as well as submitting protocols through IRB as well as other regulatory processes associated with their research during their training. We strongly encouraged the scholar to submit a K grant during their second year of the program.

For more information about the Center for Research on Minority Health/Health Disparities Research, Education and Training Consortium (HDEART) Consortium visit: http://www.mdanderson.org/departments/crmh/.

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